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Showing posts from January, 2022

The future is now. Take your projects to the next level with visual storytelling

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Humankind is built on stories. We are a species that just love a good story, and we gather around the fire each time to listen to them. We meet each other, get married, have kids, experience loss, and it all happens in places. Our childhood home, hospitals, parks, the first home after moving out from our parents’ house. We can’t help it; we are emotional about these things. In fact, what we feel is much more powerful than what we think. Of course, reasoning is important, but emotions will always win.  If you own an architecture firm, it is important to understand how emotions play into your clients’ buying choices. Take the time to know them, to get an idea of the kind of things that matter to them and try to incorporate them into your designs. But to get the wow factor, consider going a step beyond drawings and blueprints and consider using renderings.  3D technology is accessible as it had never been and as time goes by it becomes super precise. Today, it is almost impossible to dist

Home remodeling project? Catch your client’s attention by turning their ideas into experiences

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  Technology allows architects to create precise renderings of their projects. Sometimes it is impossible to distinguish between a photograph and a rendering, but that is the point.  Renderings are usually created for design analysis, marketing or presentations and they are a valuable tool to get insight on the project before building it. Before current technology, architects used to draw their renderings by hand, and while this took amazing technical skills and some of those sketches are true works of art, there is nothing like being able to see a construction as if it were a photograph before building it. Renderings allow architects to determine if the details they envisioned are correct or if they can be improved or if it is necessary to remove something.  It is easier to create further renderings than tearing down an actual construction site. But renderings are also an excellent marketing resource. Perhaps an architect can appreciate the beauty of a future construction by l

VR & AR. A way to improve eCommerce

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  With the pandemic e-commerce experienced a boom in the past year and a half and people now find themselves preferring online shopping over attending crowded malls, especially during festive times like thanksgiving or Christmas. This has forced businesses to revamp their websites to offer a smooth and efficient shopping experience for their customers and although we can get most products or services online, the truth is that some things still need our presence… or better technology. Real estate. What if you could buy a property online? Now it is possible, virtual reality technology provides realistic imagery of the property we want to visit, it is like being there. Developers and real estate companies benefit from high quality renderings to secure investments to build projects or to show them to potential buyers. Virtual reality also allows realtors to show the properties to a larger number of people. For example, a realtor can only schedule so many appointments to show properties in

Quick guide to recognizing excellent and innovative visualization projects

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A picture speaks a thousand words. We have all heard this timeless phrase and it is true, especially when it comes to renderings. In this article we’ll dig into the differences between good renderings and bad renderings, because if you have an architecture firm, you don’t want to end up with a lousy depiction of your project, you want your clients to look at your images and say “Wow, I want to be there”. But what makes a good rendering? Simple, it is realistic. A good rendering is the most effective tool to communicate your vision to your clients, keep in mind that they won’t necessarily know how to read blueprints. If a rendering is well made, some people won’t even know they’re looking at a computer-generated image. However, a bad rendering is notorious, bad colors, poor composition, randomly pasted objects, let’s just say that your client will not be impressed. What are the elements of a good rendering? Details: Details promote realism. Pay attention to things like shadows, light pl

Four reasons why visual disciplines are vital for small, medium & large architectural firms

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  Owning a business comes with great responsibility, but in the process of managing costs and trying to save money, we end up wasting opportunities. Design budgets are often left behind in the business planning, but the difference between success and failure is in the way projects are presented. Architecture firms, whether large or small, need rendering visualization to close deals and in this article, we tell you why. Renderings make you look good. If your architecture firm is small, investing in your image and in the way you present projects can make you look like a bigger firm which is important at the start of your career when your portfolio may not be as impressive.  On the other hand, if your firm is large, your customers will be expecting the most professional and aesthetic visual experience technology can provide. While it is true that an architect’s ability is measured by his completed work, it is equally important that they can get investors to come on board to the projects.

Virtual Reality allows the buyer to feel what it’s like to be in an unbuilt property

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  Virtual reality is a simulation. This technology has been around for decades, although there is a debate about its origins, we can pinpoint the creation of virtual reality in the 1950s, yes, you read that correctly. The first head-mounted display was invented in 1968 and it was known as The Sword of Damocles, their inventors were computer scientist Ivan Sutherland and his student Bob Sproull. But it wasn’t until the eighties that Jaron Lanier popularized the term “virtual reality” and ten years later, the US military and NASA started using it for training their operatives using simulations. It is the twenty-first century now, and virtual reality is stronger than ever. The era of contemporary virtual reality devices began when the PC-connected Oculus Rift prototype was introduced in 2010. The market evolved swiftly, and headsets are now untethered, making VR an independent platform. Virtual reality glasses have a stereoscopic screen that show two angles of the same image giving us a s

What do we need to envision your ideas one step closer to reality?

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  You’ve probably read a lot about how renderings are a must in architectural projects and how they are necessary to design and sell them. But where to start when hiring an architectural visualization or 3D rendering studio to visualize your project? You can approach a design studio at any stage of your project, but there are minimum requirements to get the most of your renderings. In this article, we will list the elements that you must have to hire for your rendering. 1. Architectural drawings.  This is the most essential thing to have. Most studios can work with 2D or 3D drawings and models whether they’re done in AutoCAD, SketchUp, Revit or Rhino. As a matter of fact, it will be much easier for the design studio to create your renderings if your design is detailed enough. 2. 2D plans, elevations, sections. A 2D plan is the most technical part of the project, it is a drawing on a horizontal plane viewed from above. The elevations are drawings of vertical planes in a vertical represe

Why Renderings for architectural projects are a must?

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  Technology allows architects to create precise renderings of their projects. Sometimes it is impossible to distinguish between a photograph and a rendering, but that is the point.  Renderings are usually created for design analysis, marketing or presentations and they are a valuable tool to get insight on the project before building it. Before current technology, architects used to draw their renderings by hand, and while this took amazing technical skills and some of those sketches are true works of art, there is nothing like being able to see a construction as if it were a photograph before building it. Renderings allow architects to determine if the details they envisioned are correct or if they can be improved or if it is necessary to remove something.  It is easier to create further renderings than tearing down an actual construction site. But renderings are also an excellent marketing resource. Perhaps an architect can appreciate the beauty of a future construction by looking a